Articles by: Timothy Devinney
Timothy Devinney is a University Leadership Chair, Professor of International Business and Pro-Dean of Research and Innovation at the University of Leeds (UK). Prior to that he was a Professor and Professorial Research Fellow at the Australian Graduate School of Management (AGSM) and Director of the Centre for Corporate Change and the AGSM Executive MBA. He has held positions at Vanderbilt, UCLA, Chicago, CBS and HKUST. Before joining the AGSM he held positions on the faculties of The University of Chicago, Vanderbilt University and UCLA and has been a visiting faculty member at numerous universities in Europe and Asia, and taught at many others. He has published seven books, including Managing the Global Corporation and The Myth of the Ethical Consumer (with P. Auger and G. Eckhardt) and more than eighty articles in leading journals. In 2008 he was the first recipient in management of an Alexander von Humboldt Research Award and was Rockefeller Foundation Bellagio Fellow. He is a Fellow of the Academy of International Business, ANZAM and the Advanced Institute of Management (UK) Timothy is the co-editor of the Academy of Management Perspectives and Advances in International Management as well as being on the editorial review boards of 10 other journals and a Director of SSRN's International Management and Sustainability and Social Policy Research Networks.

Now That You Have Brexit, Prepare for Brexodus
by / on October 17, 2016 at 12:07 am / in Economics, Politics & Society

Now That You Have Brexit, Prepare for Brexodus

As a foreigner living in the UK, the move to Brexit has been something of an eye-opener. Nearly three decades ago, I wrote a book that was deeply skeptical about the single market programme.  Entitled, European Markets After 1992, it […]

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BREXIT and Stern: Two Nails in the Coffin of British Academe 1
by / on July 30, 2016 at 6:30 pm / in Education

BREXIT and Stern: Two Nails in the Coffin of British Academe

The last few months have clearly been trying on the nerves and confidence of many British academics.  The vote for Brexit, and the divide it revealed between younger and more well-educated voters and those older and less well-educated, has reverberated […]

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by / on April 12, 2015 at 5:50 pm / in CSR, Management, Politics & Society

The Careless Consumer

A recent article for the Royal Society of Arts.  The article goes over the psychology of ‘ethical’ consumption, in particular the lack of alignment between ethics and natural behaviors.  It needs to be viewed in pdf format.  Download the article […]

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by / on March 24, 2015 at 7:33 pm / in CSR, Economics, Management, Politics & Society, Protests

Why Fossil Fuel Divestment Campaigns Could Do more Harm Than Good

The Guardian’s Leave It In the Ground campaign names and shames the Wellcome Trust and the Gates Foundation for not divesting their holdings in fossil fuel companies.  Editor Alan Rusbridger launched the project by declaring the case for the divestment […]

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by / on March 6, 2015 at 1:02 am / in CSR, Management, Politics & Society

Individual Social Responsibility: Why We Don’t Act in Line With What We Say

Just over 15 years ago, I was working with a global NGO helping them to engage with multinational corporations (MNCs). As part of this activity, I ran workshops in which MNC managers interacted with NGO managers on matters of mutual […]

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What Next for Space Tourism?
by / on November 4, 2014 at 11:52 pm / in Innovation, Interesting Science News

What Next for Space Tourism?

The recent accident involving Virgin Galactic’s SpaceShipTwo – and the tragic death of one pilot and critical injury of another – highlights the dangers inherent in any type of space flight. It has also brought up the inevitable discussion of […]

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The Psychology and Social Responsibility of Arthur Miller
by / on April 23, 2014 at 11:18 pm / in Literature, Politics & Society

The Psychology and Social Responsibility of Arthur Miller

This is a longer version of an article written for the London Open Air Theatre production of Arthur Miller’s All My Sons (which will show from 15 May – 7 June 2014 in Regents Park).  Unlike the programme article it […]

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The Limits of Growth in China
by / on December 4, 2013 at 11:39 pm / in Innovation, Management, Politics & Society

The Limits of Growth in China

China and Growth: An interview where I discuss one of the missing issues in the limits to growth in China: The unwillingness to give people to freedom to do more than just make money by sharing ideas, no matter how […]

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Why Even Esoteric Management Research is Critical to Management Education and Practice
by / on October 13, 2013 at 3:14 am / in Education, Innovation, Management

Why Even Esoteric Management Research is Critical to Management Education and Practice

Business scholars constantly face criticism from the media and practitioners as to the “application value” of their research. Even many academics can be heard bemoaning the fact that our research is not just “ignored” by managers but is lacking in any “relevance” to management practice. Such viewpoints neither reflect the value that management scholarship plays in the daily operations of business schools nor does they account for the value that business academics play by be outsiders removed from the daily lives of managers. What is the role of scholarship in business schools?

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Would I Win a Nobel Prize if I was Paid More? or Why Universities Need to Stop Complaining About Funding and Realize it is Their Strategy That is Wrong
by / on October 9, 2013 at 3:48 am / in Education, Innovation, Politics & Society, Uncategorized

Would I Win a Nobel Prize if I was Paid More? or Why Universities Need to Stop Complaining About Funding and Realize it is Their Strategy That is Wrong

The recent decline of the majority of Australian universities in the World University Rankings has university vice chancellors passing on the blame to the government and the system underlying the rankings. According to Prof Glyn Davis of The University of […]

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